A telegraph bearing news of the imminent Armistice arrived in the island late on 10 November.


A telegraph bearing news of the imminent Armistice arrived in the island late on 10 November. After four terrible years, the fighting would stop on the following day. As the clock struck eleven the next morning, St Helier was the scene of exuberant celebrations as crowds gathered in King Street and Queen Street to celebrate victory.

Noisy revellers cheered as they paraded around town, flags and bunting waved red, white and blue. From the nearby harbour came shrill whistles and deep horns of ships sounding in celebration, while passing hooting cars added to the din. Troops lining the ramparts of Fort Regent waved and shouted down to those in the streets below. Above them the signal station was bedecked in splendid colour.

There was a more sombre tone prevailing at the official service of thanksgiving held in the Royal Square. Politicians, churchmen, dignitaries and soldiers gathered to honour Allied victory over Germany and remember the thousands from Jersey who served, and the more than one thousand who had died between August 1914 and now, November 1918. The task of creating a permanent Roll of Honour and Service is already underway to preserve their deeds.

Associated Record:

D/AP/B/11/7 contains Jersey's Roll of Honour and Service, recording the names of those from the island who served and who died in World War One.