With Blanche Banques prisoner of war camp now reoccupied, it was only a matter of time before St Brelade’s Churchyard received more deceased German servicemen.


With Blanche Banques prisoner of war camp now reoccupied, it was only a matter of time before St Brelade’s Churchyard received more deceased German servicemen. A number were interred there during 1915 and 1916 – this week saw another buried with full military honours.

Otto Weber, a member of the elite Prussian Guard Lehr Regiment, had died two days earlier of natural causes. His funeral started at the camp with a service given by a German theology student and attended by the whole complement of prisoners. The cortege then departed for the church, led by a firing party drawn from Jersey Garrison Battalion ranks. A group of 40 POWs came next, then the hearse along with six pallbearers. Finally, a group of 100 Germans under guard brought up the procession’s rear.

Curious locals lined the route, and gathered around the churchyard while the funeral took place. With mourners assembled at the graveside, located in the cemetery’s northeast section, the coffin was lowered into the ground to the accompaniment of German military hymns and volleys of rifle fire.

Local funeral directors Messers JW and PO Dart were responsible for all the funeral arrangements.

Associated Record:

A/D1/W1/1 contains post-war correspondence relating to the deceased German POWs buried in St Brelade’s Churchyard.