Concerns over the behaviour of imported enemy alien workers came to the fore this week as one appeared in court on several charges.


Concerns over the behaviour of imported enemy alien workers came to the fore this week as one appeared in court on several charges. Max Wenzel Horkey, a 28-year-old originally from Bohemia, is facing imprisonment and then deportation as a result, the latest of several such men to leave Jersey under armed guard.

The Lieutenant Governor established the scheme in June 1917 bringing more than 70 enemy aliens to Jersey for local farm work. The men available were interned in Britain under wartime regulations, but freed on licence to assist the war effort. Horkey was among the first to arrive in Jersey, initially being employed in St Clement, then a farm at Mont-a-l’Abbé and most recently one in St Saviour.

Trouble at his latest employer led to Horkey’s appearance in the police court. Mr and Mrs Starck called the police with claims the Austrian had insulted them and then refused to leave the couple’s premises when instructed. Shortly after this incident, he was arrested at Snow Hill in a drunken state.

Finding Horkey guilty, the magistrate passed a one-month imprisonment sentence with hard labour. The Lieutenant Governor will arrange for his subsequent sending back to the UK.

Associated Record:

A/E/5 has extensive correspondence on the use of enemy alien workers in Jersey including details on Max Horkey’s arrival and subsequent deportation.