The wartime sacrifice and heroism of old boys and masters was highlighted at Victoria College’s recent prize day.


The wartime sacrifice and heroism of old boys and masters was highlighted at Victoria College’s recent prize day. Plans were also announced for a permanent memorial to honour those who had given their lives.

Under the chairmanship of Jersey’s Bailiff, the school headmaster, Mr Arthur Worrall, rose to give his report for the year. Having just returned from active service himself, it was the first Mr Worrall has made since 1914.

Among the headmaster’s many important points were that 555 old-Victorians were or had served in the armed forces since the war began. They had won an exemplary number of awards for bravery and service, including one Victoria Cross, 17 Distinguished Service Orders, 35 Military Crosses and 51 Mentions in Despatches.

Sadly, the cost had been a very high one to date, with 102 OV’s killed in action or died of their wounds. Seventy more had been wounded. On this matter, the Bailiff informed the audience, there was plans for a permanent memorial to commemorate the wartime sacrifice. ‘The list of dead of the college would be one of eternal honour and credit to the institution,’ Sir William Vernon proudly announced.

Associated Record:

L/C/54/A/4 contains the order of service for the dedication of Victoria College’s war memorial in 1924.