Thomas Colvill-Jones and his two brothers were pupils at Victoria College in the pre-war years.


Thomas Colvill-Jones and his two brothers were pupils at Victoria College in the pre-war years. Their family subsequently left for Argentina, from where Thomas sailed in 1917 bound for England and a commission in the British Army. He later moved to serve as a pilot in the Royal Flying Corps, which along with the Royal Navy Air Service became part of the newly formed Royal Airforce in April this year.

A successful airman, flying his Bristol two-seat fighter Colvill-Jones amassed 11 confirmed kills before setting out on what turned out to be his final flight. On 25 April this year, he engaged several enemy warplanes above the French village of Villers-Bretonneux. Initially holding his own, Captain Colvill-Jones became outnumbered as more German planes joined the fight. Damaged and diving to escape, his plane was riddled with ground fire and brought down in a crash landing. German troops quickly surrounded the site, pulling the captain and his observer from the wreckage.

Seriously wounded in the face and thigh, Thomas Colvill-Jones made it as far as Limburg POW camp in Germany before succumbing to his wounds on 24 May 1918 aged just 20.

Associated Records:

A/D1/R15 contains correspondence about the States of Jersey registering the Act of Parliament creating the Royal Air Force.

F/K/U2/1: Victoria College book of Remembrance annotated with the words St Peter on the inside cover- gives details of former pupils and masters of Victoria College who fell during World War I.