Despite Jersey not allowing conscientious objection as a reason to avoid conscription, it seems that a tribunal has upheld one islander’s claim for exemption on these grounds.


Despite Jersey not allowing conscientious objection as a reason to avoid conscription, it seems that a tribunal has upheld one islander’s claim for exemption on these grounds. The tribunal concerned is not in Jersey, however, but one located in England.

The young man in question, named Jeandron, recently left the island with a draft for the Dorset Regiment, having been conscripted for military service. Once in the UK, however, he raised a claim for exemption, claiming a fundamental objection to taking the life of another human being. In this case, it appears that the British law applies, and not that of Jersey.

In contrast with Britain’s Military Service Law, the version introduced in the island earlier this year did not include an exemption clause on the grounds of conscientious objection. The modification came about following a last minute amendment introduced by the Rector of St Peter. Reverend Francis De Gruchy argued that,’ at this time of national crisis, there should be no conscientious objectors’. The majority of States Members agreed.

Jeandron is reportedly the first Jersey conscientious objector to have his claim accepted. The English tribunal agreed to place him in a non-combatant corps.

Associated Record:

A/E/3 contains extensive papers on Jersey’s Military Service law, including details on Francis De Gruchy’s amendment.