The presence of German prisoners of war at the docks has led to restrictions on visiting the harbour.


The presence of German prisoners of war at the docks has led to restrictions on visiting the harbour. Anxious to avoid any awkward instances of fraternisation, the States have passed an act preventing women going onto the pier while the POWs are present.

The prisoners are employed loading vessels engaged in carrying potato exports to the mainland. Arriving each day from the Blanches Banques camp by train, the men are escorted to the pier and watched once there by a detachment of camp guards. At the Lieutenant Governor’s suggestion, the committee responsible for the harbour has passed an act restricting access to the pier while the Germans are working there.

Since arrival in March 1915, the POWs have attracted considerable attention from locals interested in observing the enemy at close hand. Access to the area around the St Ouen’s Bay camp is already subject to restrictions, in order to prevent anyone approaching the perimeter fence. The new act removes the possibility of women being near the men while they are working at the harbour.

At the suggestion of the committee, the act also excludes anyone without legitimate reason for being on the pier.

Associated Record:

A/E/5 contains correspondence between the Lieutenant Governor, Bailiff and Piers and Harbours’ Committee on restricting access to the pier while the Germans prisoners are present.