A growing issue relating to work for incapacitated ex-servicemen came to the fore this week.


A growing issue relating to work for incapacitated ex-servicemen came to the fore this week. The catalyst was a report that one employer had sacked a former soldier on grounds of being incapable of undertaking heavy work. The whole affair, a newspaper claimed, raised important questions about how Jersey should treat men left incapacitated after the war was over.

Following a severe back wound, the army discharged the man and he returned to Jersey. He managed to find work on a local farm, although his employer insisted on a fifteen-hour day, from five in the morning until eight in the evening. For this the ex-soldier received just 2/6, lower than an average woman’s daily pay of six shillings the newspaper noted.

Despite his back injuries leaving him permanently incapacitated, the farmer insisted on his new employee undertaking heavy lifting work. When the man explained his wound prevented him from doing so, he was peremptorily dismissed.

Leaving aside the question of this man’s treatment, the newspaper opined, the whole matter of how Jersey will deal with its wounded ex-servicemen after the war is a pertinent one, especially those unable to undertake normal work.

Associated Record:

D/AP/B/15 contains post-war correspondence about supporting ex-servicemen to find work.