The pages of recent newspaper editions contain a slew of official notices directed towards limiting both the selling price of certain goods and prohibiting the purchase and use of others.


The pages of recent newspaper editions contain a slew of official notices directed towards limiting both the selling price of certain goods and prohibiting the purchase and use of others. Charged with protecting islanders in wartime, the Island Defence Committee or IDC wants to ensure Jersey has sufficient stocks of food and essentials, especially during the forthcoming winter months.

Among the latest foods coming under price control are jams, jellies and syrups. Marmalade, as an example, should not cost more than 11 pence per pound. The maximum permissible price for a pound of strawberry or apricot jam is one shilling and one pence. Notices further remind retailers that anyone wishing to sell these products must register with the committee first.

Fodder too is now under IDC control, with a maximum permissible price for hay implemented. As stocks of cement are now also low, the committee has moved to limit its usage. The sale, purchase or use of cement is restricted to essential purposes only. These include sanitary works, coastal repairs and work on harbours or piers. Any other uses are not permitted, with statutory penalties in place for anyone found breaking the restrictions.

Associated Record:

A/E/10/2 contains documents and reports relating to wartime restrictions on the sale of goods including a notice from September 1918 showing official permissible prices for jams and jellies.