Undertaking war-related work in Britain has been proving popular among local women.


Undertaking war-related work in Britain has been proving popular among local women. An initial scheme to find workers for the UK munitions’ industry launched in 1916 has led to hundreds of volunteers, encouraged by both patriotic enthusiasm and the prospect of often considerably higher wages than those available locally.

Since then other opportunities to cross the Channel for war-related work have opened up. The UK Board of Agriculture & Fisheries recently contacted the island’s Lieutenant Governor about its scheme recruiting women to work on British farms. They hoped he could help establish a local committee to select and allocate Jersey women for this purpose. The rationale was that It would save the time and expense of bringing them to the mainland for interview.

After consultation with the States, however, General Wilson responded sternly to the request. Mindful of the need to free local men for military service, the Lieutenant Governor wants any women available for agricultural work to remain in the island, and take up jobs on Jersey farms. He also asked that the board forward him the names of any local women applying for UK agricultural work.

Associated Record:

A/D1/W6 contains correspondence on women workers being recruited for UK industries and Jersey’s decision to keep them available locally.