Britain has raised the thorny matter of money with Jersey’s Government recently.


Britain has raised the thorny matter of money with Jersey’s Government recently. It follows an original request made three months ago for a direct contribution from the Crown Dependencies towards the cost of the war effort. Since the disbandment of the Militia in February 1917, Britain has met the cost of Jersey’s defence - an arrangement, the Home Office points out, hardly seems fair.

A letter to the Lieutenant Governor follows the original request for payment made back in June this year. Yet, as the Permanent Secretary to the Home Office, Sir Edward Troup, reminded General Wilson, the British Government is still awaiting a response.

Jersey’s position on the matter remains the same however. Having voluntarily met the cost of Militia mobilisation since the start of the war until February 1917, the States would rather not have to pay anything more. The total expenditure ran to just over £96,000, a financial commitment that came close to bankrupting the island at times. It took the issuing of public war bonds to meet the cost.

Nevertheless, General Wilson has been assured, the matter of a financial ‘gift’ towards Britain’s war effort is under consideration.

Associated Record:

A/E/3 contains correspondence between Britain and Jersey on the matter of financial contributions towards the war’s cost.