St Saviour’s Parish Hall was the venue for Jersey’s first tribunal held under the new Military Service Law.


St Saviour’s Parish Hall was the venue for Jersey’s first tribunal held under the new Military Service Law. President C.F. Le Cornu sat with five chosen representatives to hear a number of claims against conscription, mostly for either medical reasons or on grounds of essential employment.

Among those appealing was Mr W.C. Le Boutillier on behalf of his son Walter. Addressing the tribunal, Mr Le Boutillier explained that ill-health meant he relied on the 18-year-old at the family’s Five Oaks farm. He had no other employees, and so was unable to call upon anyone else for assistance.

Arguing against granting exemptions was the army’s representative, Captain Nugent. He claimed that up until five months ago, young Le Boutillier did not actually work on the farm, being an apprentice carpenter instead. Responding, his father claimed that he had been forced to recall his son because of the labour shortage.

The tribunal also heard that whereas Walter had passed his army medical, he had a civilian doctor’s certificate stating that he was incapable of undertaking military service.

The tribunal granted an exemption until August 1917, with leave to appeal for an extension after that date.

Associated Record:

D/AP/R/10/3 contains a number of forms and instructions on how to appeal against conscription under Jersey’s Military Service Law.