Six of Jersey’s best-loved heritage sites have been made accessible to a wider range of people, through a series of innovative and creative visual stories, which have been launched during April as part of National Autism Awareness Month.


Six of Jersey’s best-loved heritage sites have been made accessible to a wider range of people, through a series of innovative and creative visual stories, which have been launched during April as part of National Autism Awareness Month.

The aim of the Visual Stories, which are free to download through the Jersey Heritage website, is to enhance the inclusiveness of Jersey Heritage attractions, not just for those with autism but to make the sites as welcoming and accessible to as many people as possible, no matter their needs.

To develop the Visual Stories Jersey Heritage has worked closely with Autism Jersey, which has also given staff and volunteers at the heritage sites autism awareness training. Lucy Layton, Outreach Curator for Jersey Heritage said, “Jersey has a rich and diverse culture and heritage and we want every visitor to our sites to enjoy their experience. These visual stories will provide our autistic visitors with an introduction to each site, so they know what to expect when they arrive.”

Paul Sullivan, Chief Operating Officer of Autism Jersey added, “We congratulate Jersey Heritage on this initiative and believe it is a first in Jersey for someone to draw up a visual story for the visiting public. People with autism can find it difficult to visit new places because they don’t know what to expect, but to have it presented like this in a very visual way makes it easier for them to cope. We hope that it doesn’t just benefit local families but those visiting from other countries.”

The Visual Stories are available for Elizabeth Castle, Mont Orgueil, Jersey Museum and Art Gallery, Maritime Museum and the Occupation Tapestry Gallery, La Hougue Bie and Hamptonne. They can be downloaded from www.jerseyheritage.org