World War 1 Blog

From 1914

What actually happened in Jersey during the Great War? How did islanders cope with a conflict that was so close to home and yet so far removed? Jersey Heritage is setting out to answer these questions over the course of the next four years by putting together a blog about daily life on the home front. Starting on Monday 30 June, and every Monday after that for the next four years, find out what was going on in the Island 100 years a century ago.

Interested in finding out more about your family history?  Visit our new online archive to start your research.



29 August 1916 →

Published:

There are serious concerns that the rising price of coal is putting it beyond the reach of the poorer classes.

22 August 1916 →

Published:

The potential dangers of swimming in St Ouen’s Bay were underlined this week following the death of a prisoner from Blanche Banques POW Camp.

15 August 1916 →

Published:

Plans to introduce compulsory military service in the island seem to have reached an impasse.

8 August 1916 →

Published:

There has been worrying news on the fate of a vessel bound for Jersey carrying a cargo of coal. The 801-ton steamboat Stobart had departed Goole in Yorkshire under the command of Captain Stewart.

1 August 1916 →

Published:

There is news that the Admiralty and War Office have decided to more closely monitor the production of postcards, to ensure none contain images that may pose a security threat.

25 July 1916 →

Published:

There was a reminder in recent days of Jersey’s ‘dual-nationality’ when it comes to the war effort. ‘France’s Day’, a fundraising campaign organised by the island’s French community, filled the streets of St Helier with red, white and blue tricolours.

18 July 1916 →

Published:

An unusual and unexpected visitor caused a great deal of excitement this week. A huge airship, believed to be French, flew over the island at low height, leading people to stop what they were doing and gather outside to watch.

11 July 1916 →

Published:

Having completed her two month prison sentence for falsifying Alien registration papers, Mrs Maria Ramm left the island under escort this week.

4 July 1916 →

Published:

The newspapers have been devoting considerable column space to the massive Anglo-French offensive that began on 1 July.

27 June 1916 →

Published:

As the potato export season begins winding down, a committee of local merchants have come together to demonstrate farming industry support for the war effort.

20 June 1916 →

Published:

After opening the debate at the start of June on introducing compulsory military service, the States were expected to resume discussions at a sitting this week.

13 June 1916 →

Published:

Islanders came together this week to remember Field Marshal Lord Kitchener, whose recent sudden death was a cause of great shock.

6 June 1916 →

Published:

The tragic impact of the Royal Navy’s recent monumental clash with the enemy has become all too apparent in recent days…

30 May 1916 →

Published:

Ever since Britain introduced conscription in March 1916, there has been intense local speculation that Jersey would have to do the same.

23 May 1916 →

Published:

There are concerns that some people arriving the Island are unaware that taking photographs is presently prohibited in Jersey.

16 May 1916 →

Published:

The States have agreed to adopt the proposed Daylight Saving bill, meaning that local clocks will advance one hour from this week.

9 May 1916 →

Published:

The dangers associated with live ammunition training have been underlined following the death of a young officer from the South Staffordshire Regiment.

2 May 1916 →

Published:

There was dismay this week at news the SS Maud, a Jersey-based 120 ton sailing vessel, has been attacked and sunk by an enemy submarine in the Channel.

25 April 1916 →

Published:

Attempts by a local woman to hide her German nationality led to an appearance before the Royal Court this week.

18 April 1916 →

Published:

Since the outbreak of war, Islanders have supported numerous appeals aimed at providing ‘comforts’ for the troops.