World War 1 Blog

From 1914

What actually happened in Jersey during the Great War? How did islanders cope with a conflict that was so close to home and yet so far removed? Jersey Heritage is setting out to answer these questions over the course of the next four years by putting together a blog about daily life on the home front. Starting on Monday 30 June, and every Monday after that for the next four years, find out what was going on in the Island 100 years a century ago.

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3 June 1917 →

Published:

Determined to see Jersey release as many men as possible for war service, the Lieutenant Governor has launched a new scheme offering replacement labourers for local farms.

29 May 1917 →

Published:

The presence of German prisoners of war at the docks has led to restrictions on visiting the harbour.

22 May 1917 →

Published:

The Lieutenant Governor, General Alexander Wilson, has issued a further order on public lighting in line with changes passed by the UK Government.

15 May 1917 →

Published:

Undertaking war-related work in Britain has been proving popular among local women.

8 May 1917 →

Published:

Since the start of the war, around 2,500 men from Jersey have joined the French armed forces.

1 May 1917 →

Published:

Reginald Laurens appeared before the Royal Court this week charged with making false claims to a military service tribunal.

24 April 1917 →

Published:

Reports coming through this week indicate that the Jersey Contingent recently suffered a considerable number of casualties while serving on defensive duties in Belgium.

17 April 1917 →

Published:

After the States recently decided against using the prisoners of war held at Blanches Banques camp for local agricultural work, the Lieutenant Governor arranged their return to the UK for labour duties there.

10 April 1917 →

Published:

St Saviour’s Parish Hall was the venue for Jersey’s first tribunal held under the new Military Service Law.

3 April 1917 →

Published:

After months of often rancorous debate and distracting delays, the full impact of Jersey’s new Military Service Act is now being felt in homes across the island.

27 March 1917 →

Published:

A small notice placed in the newspaper this week spoke volumes about a significant change presently underway in the island, and the conclusion of a way of life.

20 March 1917 →

Published:

Jersey faces a considerable challenge in meeting the recent demand of the UK Government for increased potato exports in order to help feed the army.

13 March 1917 →

Published:

The military finally took possession of the New Town Arsenal this week.

6 March 1917 →

Published:

Under the terms of Jersey’s new Military Service Act, three tribunals are being set-up in the Island.

27 February 1917 →

Published:

Local newspapers began displaying prominent notices this week asking the public to consider how much they are presently eating.

20 February 1917 →

Published:

It’s been a landmark week for the island, not just in respect of the war but for Jersey’s historic constitutional privileges.

13 February 1917 →

Published:

Having been present in the island for nearly two years, the bulk of the German prisoners held at the Blanche Banques POW camp departed this week for the UK mainland.

6 February 1917 →

Published:

A large crowd of farmers packed Don Street’s Oddfellows Hall this week to learn more on discussions between the States and UK Government about future potato exports.

30 January 1917 →

Published:

There were questions in the States this week about the Militia taking over Westmount, and more particularly the military’s use of Overdale Hospital.

23 January 1917 →

Published:

The subject of butter and its price has been a sensitive one since the beginning of the war.