World War 1 Blog

From 1914

What actually happened in Jersey during the Great War? How did islanders cope with a conflict that was so close to home and yet so far removed? Jersey Heritage is setting out to answer these questions over the course of the next four years by putting together a blog about daily life on the home front. Starting on Monday 30 June, and every Monday after that for the next four years, find out what was going on in the Island 100 years a century ago.

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16 February 1915 →

Published:

The big story of this week centres on States plans to meet the ongoing cost of defending the Island.

9 February 1915 →

Published:

The rising cost of a loaf is cause for concern at the present time. While the wealthy may be able to absorb any price increases, the poorer members of Jersey’s society are vulnerable to changes in what they have to pay for essential food.

2 February 1915 →

Published:

There are reports this week that another member of the Jersey Militia has died. Corporal Walter Cheney is understood to have passed away at the General Hospital of double pneumonia contracted while serving on Militia outpost duty.

26 January 1915 →

Published:

Despite the recent cold weather, there appears to be no slowing down in generosity when it comes to supporting Jersey’s soldiers and sailors.

19 January 1915 →

Published:

The Island’s pigeon fanciers discovered this week how the war is going to affect their activities.

12 January 1915 →

Published:

There was confirmation this week of the death in action of another young Jerseyman. Jules Blondel, who was just 17-years-old, had joined the army before the war and was serving with the Dorsetshire Regiment

5 January 1915 →

Published:

Given its long association with Britain’s military, it is understandable that many former Victoria College pupils are presently serving in the armed forces.

29 December 1914 →

Published:

A row has broken out between the military and the Parish of St Peter over work being carried out near the POW camp presently under construction in St Ouen’s Bay.

22 December 1914 →

Published:

Despite the momentous events of the past four months, it appeared to be business as usual in St Helier this festive week.

15 December 1914 →

Published:

The Island’s politicians met this week in a special session to discuss the matter of Jersey’s contribution to Britain’s war effort.

8 December 1914 →

Published:

There was a sobering reminder this week of the war’s growing impact on Islanders’ lives. The cause was news that Edward Single, a baker’s deliveryman from St Helier, appeared in court on a charge of spreading false reports about the war.

1 December 1914 →

Published:

Notices in this week’s newspapers have ended days of speculation. The British Government, it seems, has finally consented to a contingent of Militiamen leaving the Island for military service overseas.

24 November 1914 →

Published:

There was relief among States members following Britain’s endorsement of a new law enabling the raising of a war loan. The £50,000 is required to cover the ongoing cost of Militia mobilisation, which is now into its fourth month.

17 November 1914 →

Published:

‘A public disgrace’ was how one newspaper described the present situation as yet more soldiers appeared in court this week on charges of being drunk and disorderly.

10 November 1914 →

Published:

People in Jersey have been flocking to Wests’ Picture House this week. Drawing them is the latest in a series of patriotically themed films that have been showing in the Island.

3 November 1914 →

Published:

Since the outbreak of war, postponements and cancellations have affected many of the Island’s usual shows, festivals and events. There is widespread relief, however, following a decision by the War Office that Fireworks Night can still go ahead on 5 November – although with some changes from previous years.

27 October 1914 →

Published:

There was little opposition in the States this week to a proposed reduction in opening hours. It means that from now on, pubs in Jersey will need to close by eight o’clock each evening.

20 October 1914 →

Published:

Islanders demonstrated their generosity for wartime causes once more this week by responding to an appeal on behalf of those displaced by the fighting.

13 October 1914 →

Published:

Notices placed in the newspapers this week have been catching the eye of many Islanders. The Army District Office is inviting local building firms to tender for contracts associated with Jersey’s planned prisoner of war camp.

6 October 1914 →

Published:

The chronic shortage of accommodation for the Kitchener volunteers presently training in the Island was resolved this week by the requisition of a large St Helier hotel.