World War 1 Blog

From 1914

What actually happened in Jersey during the Great War? How did islanders cope with a conflict that was so close to home and yet so far removed? Jersey Heritage is setting out to answer these questions over the course of the next four years by putting together a blog about daily life on the home front. Starting on Monday 30 June, and every Monday after that for the next four years, find out what was going on in the Island 100 years a century ago.

Interested in finding out more about your family history?  Visit our new online archive to start your research.



6 July 1915 →

Published:

Islanders are coming to terms with shocking news that eight boys have lost their lives in an accident at Portelet Beach.

29 June 1915 →

Published:

The official States’ Analyst recently became involved in efforts to identify enemy spies in the Island. Mr Toms was asked to examine a letter sent by a German national that is believed to contain a secret message.

22 June 1915 →

Published:

Among the most strongly guarded places in Jersey presently are the locations where undersea telegraph cables come ashore.

15 June 1915 →

Published:

The Jersey Branch of the British Red Cross has asked for the Lieutenant Governor’s support in gaining formal recognition for its activities.

8 June 1915 →

Published:

Animosity towards the Britain’s German community remains high following the sinking of the Lusitania in May.

1 June 1915 →

Published:

News that the first load of potatoes has passed over the ‘Bridge’ bound for the UK shows that this year’s export season is getting underway as usual.

25 May 1915 →

Published:

While German submarines may not have had any success sinking vessels in Channel Islands’ waters to date, their activities are affecting some Jersey companies.

18 May 1915 →

Published:

There has been urgent attention given to the matter of how best to process Breton workers now starting to arrive for the potato harvest.

11 May 1915 →

Published:

There has been local outrage following news that a German submarine sunk the RMS Lusitania off the southern coast of Ireland.

4 May 1915 →

Published:

The newly arrived enemy prisoners continue to attract considerable local interest. As a result, curious Islanders have been approaching the POW camp in St Ouen’s Bay.

27 April 1915 →

Published:

A shortage of accommodation at the start of the war led to the Militia’s 3rd (Town) Battalion using temporary barracks established at the Canning Factory on Millard’s Corner. This week the militiamen left that location and moved to permanent quarters at Fort Regent.

20 April 1915 →

Published:

The Royal Court sat this week to hear another case of infringement of the Defence of the Realm Act, or DORA. On this occasion it related to the possession of equipment capable of sending or receiving wireless signals.

13 April 1915 →

Published:

In a recent speech, the Dean of Jersey said that he believed Islanders should follow the example of the King and give up alcohol for the duration of the war.

6 April 1915 →

Published:

Since the start of the war, the laws and regulations prohibiting trading with the enemy have progressively tightened. These have made it a serious offence to buy goods from or sell goods to German, Austro-Hungarian or Ottoman businesses.

30 March 1915 →

Published:

December’s naval bombardment of Britain’s east coast both shocked and served to remind Islanders how swiftly the war can reach out to strike formerly peaceful communities.

23 March 1915 →

Published:

Reports arriving from Ireland during the past two weeks indicate that the Jersey Contingent is settling well into their new home and training regime.

16 March 1915 →

Published:

After weeks of excited speculation, the first German prisoners of war arrived in Jersey this week.

9 March 1915 →

Published:

The master of the SS Lydia claimed that an enemy submarine attacked his vessel this week while it was en route from Jersey to England.

2 March 1915 →

Published:

The last ten days have been a whirlwind of activity as the Jersey Contingent made final preparations to leave the Island.

23 February 1915 →

Published:

There was disruption in the communications between Britain and the Island this week due to a break in an undersea telegraph cable. It is not clear when it will come back into operation.