4 April 1916 - WW1 Blog - Jersey Heritage

The Lieutenant Governor intervened this week in a dispute over passports. It followed an incident at St Helier Harbour in which arriving army officers argued that it was unnecessary for them to show any form of identity on landing in Jersey.


The Lieutenant Governor intervened this week in a dispute over passports. It followed an incident at St Helier Harbour in which arriving army officers argued that it was unnecessary for them to show any form of identity on landing in Jersey.

Assistant Aliens Officer Percy Cooke was on duty at the harbour checking passengers arriving on the daily steamer from England. He was challenged by a group of army officers, who claimed that their rank and status made them exempt from passport rules affecting other travellers. One, later reported as Major Frederick Le Mesurier of the Border Regiment, refused to show any form of identity, despite being pressed by Cooke to do so. The major is not the first – it seems that army officers are presenting a variety of documents on arrival in Jersey, or none at all.

Responding to the situation, the Lieutenant Governor has stated that all military personnel – regardless of rank – must present either a passport or valid leave certificate on arrival. General Rochfort also made it clear that the Aliens Officers have the right to challenge anyone wanting to enter Jersey, including army officers.

Associated Record:

A/E/11/15 contains a report on problems with arriving army officers and the subsequent response of the authorities.