29 December 1914 - WW1 Blog - Jersey Heritage

A row has broken out between the military and the Parish of St Peter over work being carried out near the POW camp presently under construction in St Ouen’s Bay.


A row has broken out between the military and the Parish of St Peter over work being carried out near the POW camp presently under construction in St Ouen’s Bay.

The officer in charge of building work, Major Naish, asked for permission to dig up a parish road, called Le Chemin des Basses Mielles, in order to lay a drain. While it was given, the parish insisted that the military place a gazette notice in the Evening Post bearing the signature of Constable J.H. Le Boutillier informing the public of the plans.

On discovering that the notice had Major Naish’s signature instead, the Constable wrote a strongly worded letter to the Lieutenant Governor. He accused Naish of displaying a lack of courtesy. What’s more, he claimed, the public had been placed in danger because they would ignore was what clearly not an official notice.

In a stern reply, General Rochfort reminded the Constable that under the Defence of the Realm Act, the military had absolute right the close any road – with or without a notice. If there was any act of discourtesy, Rochfort announced, it was not on behalf of Major Naish.