24 August 1915 - WW1 Blog - Jersey Heritage

While Islanders may have become used to the sight of military funerals, one held in St Peter this week attracted special attention.


While Islanders may have become used to the sight of military funerals, one held in St Peter this week attracted special attention. The deceased was a German sailor, one the prisoners of war currently held in St Ouen’s Bay.

Karl Brundig, a 21-year-old captured in 1914 following the sinking of the cruiser "Mainz", died at the camp on 24 August after a reported epileptic fit. With permission of the camp commander, Lieutenant Colonel Haines, the young man’s remains were conveyed on a carriage accompanied by 50 of his comrades. The solemn cortege left St Peter’s Barracks, where the body was lying in rest, and made its way to St Peter’s Church.

Curious locals lined the route, some climbing on walls to get a better view. Since their arrival in March 1915, interest in the enemy prisoners has remained high. One enterprising company has even organised motor bus tours from St Helier out to the camp at Les Blanches Banques.

Following a ceremony in St Peter’s Church, the coffin was carried to a grave in the churchyard and lowered into the ground to the sound of rifle volleys fired overhead.