16 May 1916 - WW1 Blog - Jersey Heritage

The States have agreed to adopt the proposed Daylight Saving bill, meaning that local clocks will advance one hour from this week.


The States have agreed to adopt the proposed Daylight Saving bill, meaning that local clocks will advance one hour from this week. It follows a decision to do the same in the UK – and pressure from the British Government for Jersey to follow suit.

Daylight saving is a wartime measure principally aimed at reducing expenditure. By advancing the clocks, the States were told, street and public building lighting can come on one hour later, leading to a considerable cost reduction. It also means an extra hour of daylight in which people could undertake work. For the remaining duration of the war, daylight saving will start each year at midnight on 20 May and last until the same time on 30 September.

Before the debate even started in the States’ Chamber, members were aware that the Lieutenant Governor had the authority to insist Jersey adopts the new law under his wartime powers. Most were willing to go along with the proposals therefore. But not everyone was happy with the situation. Jurat Payn was among the four members to oppose the bill, stating that Jersey should not just slavishly accept instruction and intervention from London.

Associated Record:

A/D1/T5 contains correspondence on daylight saving implementation and its eventual withdrawal.